Monday, October 19, 2015

BRING YOUR OWN SAGE TO GROVE HALL 11.14.15

National Congress of Black American Indians and Muhammad’s Mosque No. 11 to host community healing ritual in Grove Hall on November 14th.

GROVE HALL – In an effort to raise awareness of the historic atrocities committed against Native people in the city if Boston, Brother Mwalim (Morgan James Peters), New England Regional Director of the National Congress of Black American Indians, has called for a community healing ritual, to take place on November 14th at 1PM with the assistance of members of Muhammad’s Mosque No. 11 in Grove Hall. “We, along with other members of the community, will gather in front of the mosque with bundles of sage and sweet grass, and proceed to ‘smudge’ the streets of the neighborhood in an effort to bring spiritual healing to the area.” Brother Mwalim first announced at a forum at the mosque in late September.

Historically and presently, Grove Hall is an area that is quite familiar with violence and bloodshed over the course of several decades, especially in the 1980’s and ‘90’s. “One fact that many people are unaware of is that the area was the site of mass slaughter and burial of thousands of Wampanoag, Nipmuc, Massachusett, and Ponkapoag men, women and children in the Roxbury/ Dorchester area in the late 1600’s, the height of the conflict between colonists and native people during Mettacomet’s (King Phillip) War.” Explains, Brother Mwalim, an enrolled Mashpee Wampanoag, and keeper of the Ahanaeenunmedicine tradition.  During the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries, these graves were excavated and built over without the remains receiving proper acknowledgement or internment; a practice that wouldn’t be legislatively corrected until the 1970’s, initiated by former Commission of Indian Affairs Director and Supreme Medicine Man of the Wampanoag Nation, the late John “Slow Turtle” Peters, who was Brother Mwalim’s uncle. It is believed by many First Nation (Native) spiritualists, familiar with the history of the region, that these activities have left a blight of bad medicine throughout the Grove Hall area.

Community people are being asked to obtain their own bundles and come join in the ritual.
Burnable sage can be purchased on-line from www.wanderingbull.com as well as any number of Botanicas and aromatherapy shops around Boston. 

The National Congress of Black American Indians (NCBAI) is a non-profit spiritual community, and the central sacred circle of people of mixed African and Native American ancestry, and our relations, maintaining the spiritual and social traditions of our ancestors. The organization is based in Washington DC and New England is the first region to have a Branch, which was established during this past summer, when Brother Mwalim was appointed the Regional Director. For more information, visit www.ncbai.com or email blackwamp777@gmail.com

NCBAI Mission Statement
The mission of the NCBAI is to satisfy the Great Spirit and the souls of our ancestors by working together to:
  • Serve as a voice for Native American people with African ancestry and Spanish and Portuguese speaking Indigenous people of the western hemisphere as a political entity and active body for the rights of Native people throughout the Americas.
  • Recognize that there are Native people with African ancestry and Spanish and Portuguese speaking Indigenous people of the western hemisphere and that they still continue to exist as a strong people.
  • Define for ourselves who the Native with African ancestry and Spanish and Portuguese speaking Indigenous people are.
  • Honor all Native people with African ancestry and Spanish and Portuguese speaking Indigenous people and their respective singular and or multi indigenous nation relationships.
  • Maintain an understanding of the inherent responsibilities of Native people of African ancestry and the Spanish and Portuguese speaking Indigenous people of the western hemisphere within the larger nations of Native people regarding their traditions and spiritual practices.
  • Uphold the rights of all Native people with African ancestry, the Spanish and Portuguese speaking people of the western hemisphere, American Indians and Alaska Native people.

Founding Principles
  • To recognize and celebrate the histories and experiences of Native people of shared African and American Indian ancestry, Spanish and Portuguese speaking Indigenous people as a part of the greater Native American experience.
  • To promote healing between Native people of African ancestry, Spanish and Portuguese speaking Indigenous people, American Indian and Alaska Native recognized and not recognized within the context of larger Native communities.
  • To acknowledge that Native people of African ancestry, Spanish and Portuguese speaking Indigenous people as part of and not separate from their Native communities.
  • To educate the larger public on the presence of Native people of African ancestry, Spanish and Portuguese speaking Indigenous people throughout the Americas.
  • To help secure rights under treaties, agreements, and laws for Native people of African ancestry, Spanish and Portuguese speaking Indigenous people.
  • To contribute to the general welfare of Native people of African ancestry, Spanish and Portuguese speaking Indigenous people through programs, services and outreach.
  • To create a liaison between all Indigenous people of the western hemisphere

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