Monday, November 30, 2015

Animals Activism In Boston: DOEs BEFORE BROs!!! There's Meat In Them Thar Hills!!! Venison Recipes

DOES BEFORE BROs: Jill Hallisey of Jamaica Plain joins a
protest against deer hunting in Blue Hills Reservation yesterday.
The controlled hunt was organized to lower the overcrowded
deer population in the forest.
BLUE HILLS - Let me start with this: I'm absolutely opposed to people hunting for sport. Killing for the sake of killing is an absolute waste, to me the signs of some very, very mentally deranged people, and I can't help but notice the amazing sports hunting and white supremacist thinking. Apparently, Governor Baker, other administrators and state officials called for a culling of the herd in the Blue Hills reserve as they are over populated and a danger to plants and road hazards. Apparently, they're using a lottery system, however, aboriginal hunting rights means that state and federally recognized native hunters can also get in on the action. 

Groups of animal rights activists traveled from Brookline and Jamaica Plains, through Roxbury, Dorchester and Mattapan (with their doors locked I'm sure) to protest the "senseless" killing of deer without even a hint of irony. Gov. Baker spokeswoman Elizabeth Guyton said in a statement to the Herald, “The administration places a high value on the health of the Commonwealth’s forests and this controlled hunt, which was initiated with bipartisan support from area leaders after extensive public input, remains absolutely necessary to control the overpopulation of deer within the Blue Hills State Reservation in order to 
revitalize the forest’s ecosystem for both wildlife and visitors to benefit from for years to come.”

DCR Deputy Commissioner Matthew Sisk said the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife estimates there are 85 deer to 
every square mile of forest, when 7 to 14 is considered “healthy.” Sisk said they are devouring the vegetation and pose a traffic hazard.


Up to 200 hunters chosen by lottery will be able to bag up to two bucks and four does.
“They’re here to do a job. This is not a trophy hunt. These people are here to cull a herd that has become unmanageable and a danger to the public,” Sisk said. “All eyes will be on them over these four days.” 

Again, I am totally against hunting for sport and any lottery hunter who does not plan to eat what they shoot should probably consider hunting each other and make it a real sportsman event. On the other hand, for the rest please allow me to share a few of my favorite venison recipes. Enjoy and Eat Hearty!!!

Black people living in the Boston area should consider dressing like deer. 

UNCLE MWALIM's VENISON STEW:


3 pounds venison
3 cups water as needed
5 cups of beef or venison stock
1 large, minced onion
3 cloves of garlic minced1/3 cup all-purpose wheat flour
2 tablespoons coconut oil
1 1/2 cups chopped carrots
1 1/2 cups diced celery
1 1/2 cups red potatoes, (I prefer rutabaga and yams)
2 Cups of Green Peas
1/4 cup corn starch
Salt & Pepper to taste

Cut meat into bite-sized pieces. Mix with onions and garlic, and toss mixture with 1/3 cup wheat flour. Heat oil in a large saucepan, and cook over medium low heat until browned.

Place browned meat, celery, garlic and onions in crockpot. Add stock and water until meat is covered with 1 inch liquid. Add carrots, potatoes and/or rutabaga, salt and pepper. Cover. Slow cook on high for about 5 hours. This should be long enough to make meat very tender.

To thicken up the gravy, mix 1/4 cup cornstarch with liquid from the pot until starch is dissolved. Pour into crock pot, and stir. Repeat if not thick enough. Add peas and allow to cook until tender.

UNCLE MWALIM's VENISON SUMMER SAUSAGE:

6 pounds venison (ground)
2 tablespoons of Tender Quick Meat Curing
2 teaspoons mustard seed
2 1/2 teaspoons of sage
2 1/2 teaspoons garlic powder
2 1/2 teaspoons ground black pepper
2 1/2 teaspoons of thyme
2 teaspoons of seasoned salt
2 Tablespoons of Brown Sugar
1/8 Cup of clear vinegar

 Grind the venison using a hamburger blade or setting on the grinder.

Mix dry seasonings (except sugar and sage) and set aside.

Dissolve sugar and sage in vinegar and set aside.

Place venison in large mixing bowl and add seasoning mixture. 

Using your hands, mix the seasonings into the meat, slowly adding the vinegar mixture. Blend well.
Place in storage bowl or gallon storage bags and let sit in fridge for 72 hours. Take out each day and keep mixing.

Take mixture out, shape into patties and either fry in a skillet, with a little oil, or shape into half-pound cylinders and bake in the oven at 200 degrees Fahrenheit, turning occasionally until brown. Center of meat (use a thermometer) should be 160 - 170 degrees.




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